Remembering an icon in Nelson Mandela 10


Every Generation has one or more light houses to guide them the ups and downs. Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela – Madiba was one of those lighthouses in more ways than one; in fact, we can say he was one of the few that towered above the others to bring mankind into a new era of being.

You will be missed . Here’s hoping that others will look at your work and find ways to shine the light for others.

The South African activist and former president Nelson Mandela (1918-2013) helped bring an end to apartheid and has been a global advocate for human rights. A member of the African National Congress party beginning in the 1940s, he was a leader of both peaceful protests and armed resistance against the white minority’s oppressive regime in a racially divided South Africa. His actions landed him in prison for nearly three decades and made him the face of the antiapartheid movement both within his country and internationally. Released in 1990, he participated in the eradication of apartheid and in 1994 became the first black president of South Africa, forming a multiethnic government to oversee the country’s transition. after retiring from politics in 1999, he remained a devoted champion for peace and social justice in his own nation and around the world until his death in 2013 at the age of 95. – History.com

Africa’s Greatest Freedom Symbol

Son of a chief, Nelson Mandela studied law and became one of South Africa’s first black lawyers. Early in the 1950s he was elected leader of the youth wing of the ANC (African National Congress) liberation movement. When the country’s white minority government prohibited the ANC in 1960, Mandela became convinced that armed struggle was inevitable.

“No one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin, or his background, or his religion. People must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love, for love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite.”

Inspired by the guerrilla wars in Algeria and Cuba, he organized a military underground movement that engaged in sabotage. In 1962 he was arrested and sentenced to life imprisonment for high treason and conspiracy against the state.

From 1964 to 1982 he was confined to the notorious prison island Robben Island, together with several other resistance leaders. He was then moved to prison on the mainland until his release in 1990. During his imprisonment, Mandela became a rallying point for South Africa’s oppressed, and the world’s most famous political prisoner.

Nelson Mandela shared the Peace Prize with the man who had released him, President Frederik Willem de Klerk, because they had agreed on a peaceful transition to majority rule.

Some of our favorite quotes

“I was made, by the law, a criminal, not because of what I had done, but because of what I stood for, because of what I thought, because of my conscience.” (Statement during trial, 1962)

“For to be free is not merely to cast off one’s chains, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others.” (From Long Walk to Freedom, 1995)

“Real leaders must be ready to sacrifice all for the freedom of their people.” (Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa, April 25, 1998)

“When people are determined they can overcome anything.” (Johannesburg, South Africa, Nov. 14, 2006)

Mandela, dead at 95

Who is Nelson Mandela ?

Mandela The Man and His Country

Revolutionary, rebel and reformer, Nelson Mandela is a man who advocates freedom, though he himself has spent almost half his life in prison. Mandela, the man, the lawyer and the legend, is the focus of this program. It brings to life Mandela’s love for his country and his resistance to white domination, from the early days and his final release from prison at the age of 71.

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